Creole Shrimp Mofongo

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Easy Creole Shrimp Mofongo Recipe – delicious cajun shrimp in a spicy sweet creole stew over mofongo! This dish takes me right back to the Caribbean!

A picture of a shrimp on top of a bowl of creole shrimp mofongo
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Easy Shrimp Mofongo

This creole shrimp mofongo combines a few of my favorite recipes – my Easy Creole Sauce, Cajun Shrimp, and Easy Mofongo recipes – based off travels I’ve taken through the Caribbean.

This hearty, delicious dinner is an indulgent treat – bursting with fresh flavors, spicy and salty shrimp, mushy and savory mofongo, and tons of tomato and pepper sauce.

While this isn’t a one pot recipe, the three main elements that make up this dinner are easy enough for even a beginning home cook to tackle – and outside of a pestle (or heavy spoon that you can mash plantains with), there is no special equipment needed.

I hope you love this creole shrimp and mofongo recipe as much as I do!

If you love the creole shrimp mofongo recipe as much as I do, please give it a five star review and help me share on facebook and pinterest!

If you’ve never had mofongo, you might think it sounds a bit interesting – but you won’t believe the rich, buttery flavor in these little dumplings made from mashed plantains and pork rinds.

Mofongo is a blend of Caribbean ingredients with African and French cooking techniques – often served with complex sauces you’d expect in a fine Creole restaurant, but with a texture very similar to West African fufu dumplings.

Fufu is sometimes made with plantains (though often with yams), and mofongo’s name even sounds a bit like fufu – making it easy to trace back the heritage of mofongo in the Caribbean.

Making Mofongo is actually very simple – you basically fry plantains to soften them, then mash them up with pork rinds and shape them to serve with sauce and meat.

A picture of shrimp on top of a bowl of shrimp mofongo

How To Make Mofongo

To make this recipe, you will need the following ingredients:

For the Mofongo:

  1. Green Plantains: Green plantains are the main ingredient for Mofongo. They provide the starchy base and unique flavor. When fried and mashed, they create the signature texture of Mofongo.
  2. Chicharrón (Pork Rinds): Chicharrón adds a crunchy texture and a savory, porky flavor to the dish. It’s a key ingredient in traditional Mofongo.
  3. Bacon: Bacon adds smokiness and additional pork flavor to the Mofongo. It’s cooked and crumbled before mixing.
  4. Garlic Cloves: Garlic is a staple in Puerto Rican cuisine and provides aromatic and savory notes to the dish.
  5. Olive Oil: Olive oil is used for sautéing and frying, enhancing the overall richness of the Mofongo.
  6. Oil (for frying): Oil is necessary for frying the green plantains until they are crisp and golden brown.

For the Creole Sauce:

  1. Butter: Butter adds richness and a silky texture to the Creole sauce.
  2. Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Olive oil complements the butter and helps sauté the aromatic vegetables.
  3. Garlic: Minced garlic brings its aromatic and savory qualities to the sauce.
  4. Onions, Green and Red Bell Peppers, and Celery: These vegetables are the foundation of Creole cuisine and provide flavor, color, and texture to the sauce.
  5. Paprika: Paprika adds a smoky, earthy flavor and a touch of color to the sauce.
  6. Creole Seasoning: A blend of Creole spices, including thyme, oregano, and basil, contributes to the distinctive Creole flavor profile.
  7. Worcestershire Sauce and Hot Pepper Sauce: These condiments bring depth and a bit of heat to the sauce.
  8. Freshly Ground Pepper: Adds a zesty kick and warmth to the sauce.
  9. Diced Tomatoes with Juice: Tomatoes provide acidity and a natural sweetness to balance the flavors.
  10. Chicken Stock: Chicken stock (or vegetable stock) adds depth and liquid to the sauce, creating a flavorful base.
  11. Green Onions: Sliced green onions contribute a mild onion flavor and a pop of green color.
  12. Tomato Paste: Tomato paste intensifies the tomato flavor and thickens the sauce.
  13. Butter: An additional amount of butter is used to finish the sauce, adding richness and a glossy texture.

For the Shrimp:

  1. Shrimp: Shrimp is the star protein of the dish, bringing a sweet, briny flavor and a tender texture.
  2. Cajun Seasoning: Cajun seasoning is a blend of spices that adds a bold and spicy kick to the shrimp, infusing them with Creole-inspired flavors.

Once you’ve gathered your ingredients, we will use the following process:

For the Mofongo:

  1. Heat oil in a large pot or dutch oven.
  2. Peel the plantains, cut them into 1 1/2-inch slices, soak them in salty water for 15 minutes as oil comes to temperature.
  3. Remove plantains from water, and dry them with a paper towel before putting them in the hot pot with oil. Make sure any drops of water have been completely dried off.
  4. In small batches, fry plantains for about 12 minutes at medium-low heat or until they turn very light brown.
  5. Make sure to turn plantains as they cook.
  6. Do not brown plaintains much – you want them to stay soft and easy to mash, but the color should be a lovely dark yellow and light brown, so they are soft to the touch. Check doneness with a fork.
  7. Remove plantains from oil, and place in to a large bowl or mortar.
  8. Smash plantains with a pestle or the back of a spoon.
  9. Add some mashed garlic and pieces of pork rinds along with crumbled bacon, smashing into the plaintains.
  10. Once you have mashed all the plantains, mold them into the shape of a circle or half circle using your hands – make 8 circles.

For the Shrimp:

Add shrimp to a bowl or plastic bag with creole seasoning, and toss well to coat.

Set aside until needed later.

For the Creole Sauce:

  1. Heat butter and oil over medium-low heat in a medium saucepan.
  2. Add chopped garlic, onions, peppers, and celery. Sauté the vegetables for about 5 to 7 minutes, until just tender.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the paprika, Creole seasoning, thyme, oregano, basil, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and ground pepper in a small cup.
  4. Stir tomatoes into the vegetables then add the seasoning mixture. Sauté for 1 minute longer.
  5. Add chicken or vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Stir in the sliced green onions.
  6. Add shrimp to pot.
  7. Continue boiling, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Most of the liquid will cook away, and shrimp will turn bright pink and opaque.
  8. Stir in the tomato paste and butter until well blended into the sauce.
  9. Serve immediately over mofongo in large, deep dish or bowl.
A picture of a plantain mofongo with shrimp on top

Tips for making Easy Shrimp Mofongo

Creole Shrimp Mofongo can be made into giant dumplings – or smaller dumplings and even used in soup!

For this recipe, we will make 8 mofongo dumplings – but you can vary the serving to be more or less based on how big you make the mofongo dumpling balls.

  • Heat oil in a large pot or dutch oven.
  • Peel the plantains, cut them into 1 1/2-inch slices, soak them in salty water for 15 minutes as oil comes to temperature.
  • Remove plantains from water, and dry them with a paper towel before putting them in the hot pot with oil. Make sure any drops of water have been completely dried off.
  • In small batches, fry plantains for about 12 minutes at medium-low heat or until they turn very light brown.
  • Make sure to turn plantains as they cook.
  • Do not brown plaintains much – you want them to stay soft and easy to mash, but the color should be a lovely dark yellow and light brown, so they are soft to the touch. Check doneness with a fork.
  • Remove plantains from oil, and place in to a large bowl or mortar.
  • Smash plantains with a pestle or the back of a spoon.
  • Add some mashed garlic and pieces of pork rinds along with crumbled bacon, smashing into the plaintains.
  • Once you have mashed all the plantains, mold them into the shape of a circle or half circle using your hands.
  • Serve hot with chicken broth, creole sauce, stew, or your favorite meat or vegetables.

FAQs

what is shrimp mofongo?

Shrimp Mofongo is a traditional Puerto Rican dish made with mashed fried green plantains, garlic, and pork cracklings (chicharrón). In this version, it’s served with shrimp on top.

What kind of shrimp is best for a shrimp mofongo?

You can use various types of shrimp for this dish, but large shrimp (16/20 count) are a popular choice. They’re typically peeled and deveined before cooking.

How can I get the perfect texture for shrimp mofongo?

The key to achieving the right texture is to ensure that the green plantains are fully cooked and tender when mashed. Be patient when frying them; they should be crisp on the outside and soft on the inside.

Can I customize the seasonings in shrimp mofongo?

Absolutely! While traditional Mofongo uses garlic and pork cracklings for flavor, you can customize it with your favorite seasonings. Some people like to add spices like cumin, paprika, or chili powder for extra flavor.

What can I serve with shrimp mofongo?

Shrimp Mofongo can be served with a variety of side dishes, including a simple tomato salsa, avocado slices, a drizzle of hot sauce, or a side salad. It’s versatile and pairs well with many flavors.

Can I make shrimp mofongo in advance?

You can prepare the mashed plantains and shrimp separately in advance and then reheat them before serving. However, for the best texture, it’s ideal to fry the plantains just before serving.

is shrimp mofongo spicy?

The level of spiciness in Shrimp Mofongo can be adjusted to your taste. You can add as much or as little chili pepper or hot sauce as you like to achieve your preferred level of heat.

What is the origin of mofongo?

Mofongo is a traditional Puerto Rican dish with African and Taino influences. It’s a beloved staple in Puerto Rican cuisine and has variations across the Caribbean.

Can I use ripe plantains for mofongo?

Traditional Mofongo is made with green (unripe) plantains because they have a starchy texture. Ripe plantains are sweeter and won’t provide the same consistency. However, you can explore variations with ripe plantains for a different flavor profile.

A picture of shrimp mofongo

What to Serve With Creole Shrimp Mofongo

If you’re planning on making this mofongo for a dinner party or Sunday supper, you’re probably wondering what to serve with shrimp mofongo.

I’ve rounded up my favorite easy side dishes that will perfectly pair with this creole shrimp and mofongo dinner.

Click each link to find the easy printable recipes for Brazilian Cheese Bread, Shishito Peppers, The Best Carne Asada, and more!

Try these other favorite recipes:

A picture of shrimp on a bowl of easy shrimp mofongo

If you love this easy shrimp mofongo recipe as much as I do, please give it a five star review (just click the stars below) and help me share on facebook and pinterest!

Easy shrimp mozambique with creole sauce. This recipe takes traditional shrimp mozambique and adds a flavorful creole twist, resulting in a delicious and spicy dish perfect for any seafood lover. The succulent

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A bowl of food with shrimp and polenta.

Easy Shrimp Mofongo

Yield: 8
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes

Easy Creole Shrimp Mofongo Recipe - delicious cajun shrimp in a spicy sweet creole stew over mofongo! This dish takes me right back to the Caribbean!

Ingredients

For the mofongo:

  • 4 green plantains
  • 1 lb of chicharrón (pork rinds)
  • 1 slice bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 3 garlic cloves, mashed
  • 4 teaspoons of olive oil
  • 2 cups oil, for frying

For the Creole Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic (minced)
  • 1/4 cup onions (chopped, about 1/2 medium onion)
  • 1/4 cup green bell pepper (chopped)
  • 1/4 cup yellow or red bell pepper (chopped )
  • 1/2 cup celery (chopped)
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf basil
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 can (14.5 ounces each) diced tomatoes with juice
  • 1 can (approximately 1 2/3 cups) chicken stock ​(or vegetable stock)
  • 4 green onions (sliced, with most of the green)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons butter

For the Shrimp:

  • 1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 tbsp cajun seasoning

Instructions

For the Mofongo:

  1. Heat oil in a large pot or dutch oven.
  2. Peel the plantains, cut them into 1 1/2-inch slices, soak them in salty water for 15 minutes as oil comes to temperature.
  3. Remove plantains from water, and dry them with a paper towel before putting them in the hot pot with oil. Make sure any drops of water have been completely dried off.
  4. In small batches, fry plantains for about 12 minutes at medium-low heat or until they turn very light brown.
  5. Make sure to turn plantains as they cook.
  6. Do not brown plaintains much - you want them to stay soft and easy to mash, but the color should be a lovely dark yellow and light brown, so they are soft to the touch. Check doneness with a fork.
  7. Remove plantains from oil, and place in to a large bowl or mortar.
  8. Smash plantains with a pestle or the back of a spoon.
  9. Add some mashed garlic and pieces of pork rinds along with crumbled bacon, smashing into the plaintains.
  10. Once you have mashed all the plantains, mold them into the shape of a circle or half circle using your hands - make 8 circles.

For the Shrimp:

Add shrimp to a bowl or plastic bag with creole seasoning, and toss well to coat.

Set aside until needed later.

For the Creole Sauce:

  1. Heat butter and oil over medium-low heat in a medium saucepan.
  2. Add chopped garlic, onions, peppers, and celery. Sauté the vegetables for about 5 to 7 minutes, until just tender.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the paprika, Creole seasoning, thyme, oregano, basil, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and ground pepper in a small cup.
  4. Stir tomatoes into the vegetables then add the seasoning mixture. Sauté for 1 minute longer.
  5. Add chicken or vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Stir in the sliced green onions.
  6. Add shrimp to pot.
  7. Continue boiling, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Most of the liquid will cook away, and shrimp will turn bright pink and opaque.
  8. Stir in the tomato paste and butter until well blended into the sauce.
  9. Serve immediately over mofongo in large, deep dish or bowl.
Nutrition Information
Yield 8 Serving Size 1 mofongo ball and 1/2 cup creole sauce and shrimp
Amount Per Serving Calories 524Total Fat 84gSaturated Fat 14gTrans Fat 1gUnsaturated Fat 66gCholesterol 187mgSodium 2733mgCarbohydrates 48gFiber 4gSugar 23gProtein 51g

Nutrition is automatically calculated by Nutritionix - please verify all nutrition information independently and consult with a doctor or nutritionist for any and all medical and diet advice.

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About Courtney

Courtney loves to share great wine, good food, and loves to explore far flung places- all while masting an everyday elegant and easy style at lifestyle blog Sweet C’s Designs. Sweet C's devoted to finding the best food and drinks you'll want to make or find, around the world!

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5 Comments

  1. I love trying new dishes and this one looks amazing! I’m sure my kids will get a kick out of saying the name too, lol!